Yelly Writes

The quiet times

“When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.” ― Ansel Adams

I’ve always had something to say, an opinion to express, or an argument to make.  My family encouraged vocal discourse; my father’s family fostered an environment where dry, sarcastic humour was used to drive home a point; my mother’s family encouraged debate – about everything: political opinion, religious dogma, the traffic, the path of the ants on the wall, you name it, my mother’s family would happily discuss and argue about it.  So naturally, I talked.  A lot.  It was the only logical development in my communication progression.  I had to fight to be heard, so I learned how to talk.

But lately, I’ve found that quietness is good to.  That thinking and not necessarily talking about the thoughts that run through your head is also a good thing.  I’ve learned that sometimes chatter is just a filler. Sometimes companionable silence is a sign of true acceptance and belonging. You don’t always have to say things to be understood.

Of course, the caveat to that is that one has to talk, so that feelings can be understood and there won’t be any misunderstandings.  There is that old maxim that says “actions speak louder than words.”  This is true.  I am also of the persuasion that things that can be said must be said.  It’s never better left unsaid.

Advertisements
Yelly Writes

Thank you for the technology!

I just finished sending a happy birthday email to a beloved aunt.  Earlier today, I chatted to my Abba who is ill in hospital.  I was able to see him and he was able to see me.  Every Sunday, I chat to my family via Skype.  I send free text messages to my family in Manila and friends everywhere in the world via iMessage and other apps.

To all the inventors of these wonderful innovations, I am thankful.  The technology not only helps me reach out across the miles, it makes the world a little smaller and living on the other side of the world and getting in touch with family isn’t as difficult as it used to be.  You, ladies and gentlemen, should be given medals!

Thank you for the technology!